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Mochi-Fu, 1.23 oz

Original price $9.80 - Original price $9.80
Original price
$9.80
$9.80 - $9.80
Current price $9.80

Fu (wheat gluten) has been enjoyed in Japan for centuries, and in particular it is essential to kaiseki ryori (a traditional Japanese elegant multi-course meal), shojin ryori (traditional food for Buddhist monks), and Kyoto-style cuisine. Today, it is valued as a great protein source among vegans worldwide. Made from wheat, water, and rice flour, Mochi Fu by Hanbey-fu, esteemed fu specialty manufacture in Kyoto, features a silky smooth and chewy texture. Hanbey-Fu was founded in 1689 by Hanbey Tamaoki who learned how to make fu while he was serving at the Imperial Palace. The long-standing company uses the traditional methods passed down over their 330 year history—kneading wheat flour and water, resting the dough, and washing it with water until it separates into gluten and starch. Then rice flour is added to the gooey gluten and kneaded further. It is shaped into bite-sized balls by hand, baked at very low heat and slowly dried for one whole day and night. Since water plays an important role in the fu making, Kyoto’s mild soft water contributes greatly to Mochi Fu’s exquisite flavor. No preservatives or chemical additives are used.

Mochi Fu has a silky smooth and chewy texture as well as the ability to absorb flavors from other ingredients when cooked together. This makes it a perfect topping for Japanese dishes like sukiyaki, hot pot, simmered dishes, and miso soup, but it can also accompany various genres of cuisine, including desserts. Soak Mochi Fu in a bowl of water for 20-30 minutes then squeeze out the water before incorporating it into your cooking (do NOT place into boiling water without this preparation step as the dough will shrink and harden). With a cute ball shape, Mochi Fu can accentuate your dishes visually as well.

Wheat Flour, Wheat Protein.

Customer Reviews

Based on 2 reviews
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H
Hisayo McCloskey
Chewy taste

First, it takes about 30 minutes to get soft Fu in water. Second, the taste is chewy unlike other ordinary types of Fu. Conclusion, I prefer Sukiyaki Fu and Otsuyu Fu for soup and Nabe. I finally understood the name of the product “ Mochi” means. I am familiar with many types of Fu and this Mochi Fu is my first experience for cooking. I can say it’s interesting but not so fascinating to me. Anyway thank you for giving me a chance to try a new taste of famous Hanbei Fu.

J
Jeannette J.
Surprising Ingredient!

I'm pretty much new to cooking with Japanese ingredients, and had never tried mochi-fu before. It was very easy to prepare, and it added a bit of "starch" to the soup I made. It took on the taste of the broth, and I probably could have left it in the soup stock longer. I really need to find more recipes for this!